Filtering by: 13 June

Jun
13
6:30 PM18:30

Go and Create Something

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In the final chapter of Ulysses, Molly Bloom reflects “I wouldnt give a snap of my two fingers for all their learning why dont they go and create something”.

Joyce’s work has long served as an inspiration not only for writers, but for artists working across the disciplines, from music and dance to visual art and theatre. This Bloomsday Festival, we’ll be celebrating Joyce’s effect on the non-literary arts by bringing together actor Janet Moran, filmmaker Tommy Creagh and illustrator Niall Laverty from At it Again! They will discuss Joyce’s impact on their practice.

Actor Janet Moran played Molly Bloom in the Abbey Theatre Production of Ulysses. Known for her roles in Trivia (2011), Breakfast on Pluto (2005) and The Butcher Boy (1997), Moran recently co-hosted the Irish Times Theatre Awards. Her play-writing credentials include ‘A Holy Show’ and ‘Swing’, an international hit about dancing and music and love, in which she also performed.

Niall Laverty is an illustrator and gesture drawing teacher. He is currently a part-time lecturer on the Animation course at the National Film School. At it Again! bring Irish literature to life. They celebrate Irish writers and their works with fun pocket books and other literary gifts.

Tommy Creagh is an award winning Filmmaker & Playwright. He has a passion for poetry and how it can be brought into the cinema. His film ‘Land of Winter’ is inspired by Joyce’s short story ‘The Dead’ and follows a troubled young man between pubs, whilst snow clouds loom over Dublin. The short film will be shown at the event.

Extra screening: ‘Land of Winter’ will have a Bloomsday screening as part of the Elevation Indie Film Awards. Book tickets here. Screening of ‘Land of Winter’ on 16th June from 6.45 - 8pm at the Sugar Club, 8 Leeson Street Lower, Dublin 2.

 
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Jun
13
6:00 PM18:00

Joycean Pub Crawl - SOLD OUT

 
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Dublin is renowned for its pub culture and, fittingly, Joyce captured a little bit of that culture in the pages of Ulysses. Some of the most important scenes in the novel take place in public houses, whether it’s the famous lunch enjoyed by Bloom in Davy Byrne’s, the musical interlude in the bar of the old Ormond Hotel in the ‘Sirens’ episode or the run-in with the nationalistic Citizen in Barney Kiernan’s of Little Britain Street. So what better way to discuss Joyce than over a few pints of porter?

Join our guide on a tour to some of Dublin's best-loved pubs and learn all about the life and times of the author in the establishments that inspired his work. You'll take in bars like the Gresham Hotel, Mulligan's and of course Davy Byrne's, where Leopold Bloom takes his lunch with a tipple. You’ll have fun, make friends, learn something and most likely forget it again before morning!

This tour is now Sold Out, please have a look over the rest of the programme to discover an alternative tour to book!

 
 
 
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Joyce & Yeats Tour - Sold Out
Jun
13
2:00 PM14:00

Joyce & Yeats Tour - Sold Out

 
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Celebrate the birthday of Irish poet W.B. Yeats with this very special walking tour focusing on his tumultuous relationship with the young James Joyce. James Joyce and W.B. Yeats are indisputably the two most recognisable and pivotal figures of twentieth-century Irish literature. Though contemporaries, they represent very different cultural, religious, political and artistic traditions, each playing a distinct role in the history of Irish art. While the elder Yeats emerged from an Anglo-Irish Protestant background and committed himself to the idea of the Irish nation, Joyce emerged from the newly assertive generation of middle class Catholics and went on to reject nationalist politics in favour of the pursuit of artistic independence. Despite their differences, the relationship that existed between Joyce and Yeats was highly significant, oscillating from oedipal struggle and dismissal to mutual respect and active support. Join our guide on a tour that traces this relationship through the streets of the city, visiting such sites of interest as the Abbey Theatre, the GPO and the National Library. This tour ends at Merrion Square.

This tour is now Sold Out, please have a look over the rest of the programme to discover an alternative tour to book!

 
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Jun
13
1:05 PM13:05

Of Thyme and Rosemary

 
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Enjoy an informal rehearsed reading of the one-act play ‘Of Thyme and Rosemary’, a conversation between James Joyce and Marcel Proust. The authors first met on 18 May 1922 at a private dinner party at the Hotel Majestic in Paris.  Among the guests were fellow icons of Modernism Diaghilev, Stravinsky and Picasso. The conversation between Proust and Joyce was variously reported. According to one account, Joyce complained about his eyes and Proust his stomach. Written by Boston-based playwright Debbie Wiess, ‘Of Thyme and Rosemary’ depicts an imagined second meeting, in which the iconic writers had a true meeting of minds over some white wine.  

A founding member of Boston-based Here Comes Everybody Players, Cathal Stephens has been performing work related to James Joyce and his work for over twenty-five years.  He has performed at literary conferences and festivals throughout North America and Europe.

Jack Walsh studied mime and Theatre in Paris and has played on almost every stage in Ireland. He volunteers at Sweny’s Joycean Pharmacy and will play Leopold Bloom in ‘A Play on Ulysses’ in Blackrock on 16th June. He is currently working on a one man show called ‘Welcome To Ireland’ at the Axis Theatre, Ballymun.

Debbie Wiess is a Boston-based writer, director and producer. She is a published author and her work has been presented throughout the US and abroad. ‘Of Thyme and Rosemary’ is her second play about iconic authors James Joyce and Marcel Proust.

 
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Jun
13
11:00 AM11:00

Dubliners Walking Tour - SOLD OUT

 
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Joyce once referred to Dublin as the ‘centre of paralysis’, a city that he felt was backward and repressive in contrast to the modern capitals of Europe. This idea found its expression in Dubliners, a short story collection that illustrates the effects of this restrictive atmosphere on the city’s population. Join our guide on a walk that visits some of the key locations from both the collection and the author’s life, discussing all the while Joyce’s critical portrayal of the social, religious and political landscape of his home town. This tour also gives some insight into the publication history of the collection, itself a story that creates a sense of Joyce’s artistic mission and his controversial approach to writing about Dublin. This tour ends around O’Connell Street.

This tour is now Sold Out, please have a look over the rest of the programme to discover an alternative tour to book!

 
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